Ball and roller screw linear actuators: How to compare service life

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on

manufacturing equipment.jpgWhen you’re designing equipment, you ‘ll probably be asked, “How long will this machine last?” And even if you’re not asked outright, you know service life is an essential consideration. It’s a critical factor you consider when sourcing components.

Electric linear actuators are important components in many machines, and the “how long will it last” question is a familiar one. If it’s a ball or roller screw actuator, you can use a formula to help estimate life based on load – the same formula used to estimate bearing life.  This Guide from Tolomatic explains how to use this formula to calculate L10 life for electric linear actuators.

Actuator Life Guide

The Guide shows you how to estimate life in units of travel and units of time.  It even explains how to compare the estimated life of two different actuators.  Here’s a summary, starting with a review of terms.

Important terms

Dynamic Load Rating (DLR) is the constant load under which a ball bearing device will achieve 1 million revolutions (rotations). The manufacturer usually provides this information.  It’s represented by the letter C.

L10 (or B10) Life is the number of revolutions which 90% of a group of identical actuators have the statistical probability to achieve (or at which 10% can be expected to fail). The calculation assumes a group of identical screw actuators operating under the same conditions.

Comparing actuatorsElectric rod actuator

RSX rod actuatorLet’s say you’re considering two actuators for an application.  It’s important that you compare the estimated service life (L10 life) of each alternative so you can identify which one will fit your application's needs best. 

Use this formula when you're faced with this situation:

Life comparison of products A vs. B =

(DLR A / DLR B)3 • (Screw Lead A / Screw Lead B)

Use the higher Dynamic Load Rating (DLR) as DLR A.

This formula can be used to compare ball vs. roller screw actuators, two different sizes of the same model, two different actuators from the same manufacturer or actuators from two different manufacturers.

Examples

When the actuators have the same screw leads – DLR A (8000 lbf); DLR B (4000 lbf); both with 5 mm lead

 A vs B = (8,000/4,000)3 • (5/5) = 8 • 1 = 8

This means product A has an estimated 8 times the L10 life of product B.

When two actuators have different screw leads – DLR A (8000 lbf) w/ 5 mm lead; DLR B (4000 lbf) with 10 mm lead

A vs B = (8,000/4,000)3 • (5/10) = 8 • 0.5 = 4

This means product A has an estimated 4 times the life of product B.

Why do we care about screw leads? Because DLRs are based on 1 million screw revolutions, life must be normalized for different leads.

Use with caution

There are two things to keep in mind when using this life calculation:

  • The first is that the L10 formula and this comparison formula give you theoretical estimates of service life only.  These are not guarantees.
  • The second is that load is just one factor affecting actuator life. Other things that can negatively affect life or cause premature failure include incorrect mounting/alignment, lubrication starvation, temperature and other environmental factors, like corrosive agents.

Learn more

For further explanation of the L10 life calculation, our guide, Actuator Life: How to estimate for ball and roller screw actuators, can be downloaded here. 

Actuator Life Guide

Topics: Actuator selection

Happy Holidays

Posted by Tolo Matic on

Ring bells, ring

Tolomatic 2016 holiday greeting

Wishing you lots of joy this season.

Topics: News and Noteworthy

Corrosion resistant integrated linear servo actuator is high force

Posted by Nick Holmgard on

aerospace mfrg.jpgThe electric rod actuator is an industrial workhorse, one you’ll find in a wide range of machine tool, conveying and positioning applications.  A familiar mechanism, yes. But identifying one that’s compact, corrosion resistant and can deliver high force is a tall order. A corrosion resistant integrated linear servo actuator can be the answer.

When it comes to corrosion resistance and selecting the right electric actuator for the job, a machine designer needs a thorough understanding of the specific industrial environment. Once you’ve identified all the corrosive substances, the IP (Ingress Protection or International Protection) rating system offers a way to make the best equipment selection. Although the system was originally developed for enclosures, it also can be used to match electric linear actuators to environmental conditions.

If you’re not familiar with the IP rating system, download this white paper from Tolomatic. 

IP Ratings White Paper

Welding application calls for high force, corrosion resistance

A manufacturer was welding titanium aerospace components.  The application called for several electric linear actuators to secure the parts, holding them in place for welding.  Positioning accuracy was critical, space was limited and the actuators needed to deliver the force to hold the components in place. A further complication: the process used deionized water for cooling, a substance that is corrosive to most materials including anodized aluminum.

This application needed high force linear actuators that were compact, corrosion resistant and highly accurate.

Integrated, high force linear actuator is solutionIMA servo actuator - aerospace manufacturing.gif

The manufacturer’s design engineers accepted our recommendation of IMA33 integrated linear servo actuators. IMA series actuators have integrated servo motors that deliver superb positioning accuracy. The integration of the servo motor and actuator mechanism creates a space-saving, compact linear actuator system.  IMA high force linear actuators deliver the clamping force needed in the application.

Additionally, the IMA integrated linear servo actuators were given special stainless steel housings designed with an IP69K rating to withstand the moisture and corrosion of the cooling process.  (Generally, the first number in an IP rating indicates the level of protection (0-6) against solid particles. The second number is the level of protection (0-9K) against liquids.)

These corrosion resistant actuators provide long life even in harsh conditions. The actuators’ compact design helps minimize machine footprint. Excellent positioning accuracy and high clamping force improve weld quality and yield.

IMA integrated linear servo actuator has unique design

ima servo actuator featuresThe IMA  integrated linear servo actuator features a compact, heavy duty package.  The integrated servo motor provides excellent positioning accuracy and is fully programmable. Available in both ball and roller screw configurations, IMA integrated servo actuators can provide forces up to 6875 lbs (30 kN). Plus, IMA servo actuators offer seamless integration with the Rockwell Automation Kinetix platform.

This unique integrated servo actuator design eliminates:

  • Motor couplers, adapters, timing belts, gear boxes
  • Unneeded assembly labor
  • Forced air or water cooling
  • Hydraulic systems
  • Pneumatic systems
  • Need for multiple vendors

For an overview of IMA integrated electric rod actuators, download our catalog. IMA Linear Servo Actuators Catalog

Learn more

For further explanation of the IP rating system, our white paper, IP ratings and the manufacturing environment: How to apply linear actuators for quality, safety and long service life, can be downloaded here. 

IP Ratings White Paper

Topics: Actuator selection, High force linear actuators

Hydraulic vs high force electric linear actuators: new infographic

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on
hydraulic vs electric actuators infographicChoosing the best linear actuator for a task takes a thorough understanding of the application. The basics like the weight of the load, the distance the load’s to be moved, and the speed and force needed are all important factors. A machine designer may also need to consider variables like environmental conditions, data collection and reporting needs as well as flexibility/programmability requirements.

If the application calls for a high force linear actuator, the usual solution has been a hydraulic cylinder. However, high force electric linear actuators are now available  (many with roller screws) and offer distinct advantages. Our new infographic compares the performance of electric, hydraulic and servohydraulic actuators on intelligence and operational parameters.

For even more information on the strengths and drawbacks of these technologies, see our white paper that compares hydraulic and electric linear actuators.

White Paper: Hydraulic versus Electric Linear Actuators

 

 

Intelligence

Control of motion variables
  • A hydraulic cylinder works well in simple, end-to-end positioning applications. However, applications that call for mid-stroke positioning require a servohydraulic actuator with a more complicated set-up.
  • An electric actuator with roller screw and servo drive/motor (like our new RSX extreme force electric rod actuator) offers infinite control over position, velocity, acceleration/deceleration, output force and more. Adjustment can be made on the fly, plus accuracy and repeatability is far better than that of a hydraulic system.

Data_visualization_process.pngData collection and reporting

There’s an emphasis on continuous improvement in manufacturing. Management wants to monitor and measure all aspects of production performance. This calls for data collection at the work point.

  • Standard hydraulic actuation systems don’t have data collection capabilities. Only expensive, complex servohydraulic systems with additional sensors can track and monitor position, velocity, force and so on at the work point.
  • Sensing capability is built into an electric actuator’s servo system. Motor current monitoring tracks force and repeatability. The motor’s feedback device registers position and velocity.

Operation

Electricity costs
  • Hydraulic systems are typically 40-55% efficient in converting electrical power to motion. Also, the HPU needs to be powered up whenever the system is on to keep  it pressurized, resulting in inefficient use of power.
  • Electric linear actuator systems, like the RSX-096 hydraulic class electric linear actuator, typically operate in the 75-80% efficiency range. When an electric actuator is at rest, it needs little or no current to hold its position.
Sensitivity to temperaturethermometer 3.jpg
  • Hydraulic oil gets thicker and slower-moving in the cold resulting in sluggish and inconsistent actuator performance. In higher temperatures, caused by overheating or the environment, oil degrades and seals fail.

A tank heater can maintain operating temperature in the cold. A heat exchanger can mitigate overheating.  However, these additional system components mean additional cost.

  • Due to their higher efficiency, electric actuator systems can run at a desired temperature for the given amount of work required. Also, electric actuators can be specified with optional extreme temperature grease for fast response in the cold.

RSX extreme force, hydraulic class electric actuators

RSX096 extreme force hydraulic class actuator_featuresOur new RSX extreme force electric linear actuators are more efficient and flexible than hydraulic cylinders. Using roller screw technology, RSX actuators are designed and tested for 100% duty cycle. The first RSX actuator in the family, the RSX-096, delivers up to 30,000 lbf (133.5 kN). It can withstand extreme conditions and cold weather operation.

Learn more

Download our white paper: Electric rod actuators vs. hydraulic cylinders: a comparison of the pros and cons of each technology.

  White Paper: Hydraulic versus Electric Linear Actuators

Topics: High force linear actuators

Electric linear actuator ebook: A resource

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on
Electric-Linear-Actuators-ebook-from-TolomaticIndustrial automation counts on the reliable motion control that linear actuators provide. Lately, electric linear actuators have gotten more popular because they offer better control of variables like speed, acceleration, position and force than pneumatic or hydraulic cylinders. Electric actuators also offer superior accuracy and repeatability, as well as programmable control that can handle even complex motion profiles.  In many applications they can do all this at a lower cost of ownership than pneumatic or hydraulic actuators.

Now there’s a resource from Tolomatic that lays out all the issues a designer needs to understand in order to select the best electric linear actuator for an application. You can download a copy of our ebook resource here. 

Ebook: A resource on electric linear actuators

Contents

Here’s what you can expect to learn from this ebook:

  • WHY ELECTRIC ACTUATORS?
    • What is a linear actuator?
    • Electric linear actuator advantages
  • ACCURACY AND REPEATABILITY IN LINEAR ACTUATORS
    • Definitions
    • Differences between accuracy and repeatability
    • Infographic on accuracy and repeatability
    • White paper on accuracy and repeatability
  • SELECTING THE RIGHT ACTUATOR: ROD OR RODLESSselecting electric rod actuators or rodless electromechanical actuators
    • Electric rod actuators
      • Infographic on tips for selecting electric rod actuators
      • White paper on how to select electric rod actuators
      • Webinar on how to select electric rod actuators
    • Rodless electromechanical actuators
      • Infographic on tips for selecting rodless electromechanical actuators
      • White paper on how to select a rodless electromechanical actuator
      • Webinar on how to select a rodless electromechanical actuator
      • White paper on screw-driven vs. belt-driven linear actuators
    • Screw selection
      • Guide to selecting the right screw type for an application -- acme, ball or roller screw
    • Environmental factors
      • White paper on IP ratings and linear actuators
    • How to compare manufacturers’ specs
      • White paper on how to calculate an “apples to apples” comparison
    • How to calculate actuator life
      • Guide to using L10 life formula for ball and roller screw-driven actuators
      • White paper on calculating actuator life
  • MOTOR SELECTION
  • SYSTEM INSTALLATION CONSIDERATIONS
    • Actuator/guide alignment
      • White paper on rules for alignment in linear motion systems
    • Electrical noise
      • White paper on minimizing electrical noise
  • ELECTRIC ACTUATOR APPLICATIONS (Examples of improved efficiency)
    • Automotive manufacturing
      • White paper on actuators for robotic resistance spot welding
      • Slide show on actuators for robotic resistance spot welding
    • Process industries
      • White paper on linear actuators for valve actuation
    • Food and beverage processingfood processing
      • White paper on selecting actuators to withstand washdown environments
      • Video on selecting actuators to withstand washdown environments
    • Material handling
      • Two case studies on conveying applications
  • TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP (TCO)
    • Infographic comparing TCO of electric actuators vs. pneumatic actuators
    • White paper on comparing TCO of electric actuators vs. pneumatic actuators
    • White paper comparing hydraulic cylinders and electric rod actuators
Each chapter in the ebook includes links to further resources for machine designers – white papers, blog posts, infographics, design tools and more. You can pick a topic you want to learn about, read an overview or go deeper into the subject by clicking a link.

Learn more

Download our ebook: A resource on electric linear actuators - What a machine designer needs to know

Ebook: A resource on electric linear actuators

Topics: Actuator selection, News and Noteworthy

Electric high force linear actuators w/ roller screws rival hydraulic

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on
roller screw.jpgWhen you’re specifying a high force linear actuator, your application’s requirements call the shots. It used to be that hydraulic cylinders were your only recourse when high force was needed.  Now there are electric linear actuators with roller screws that rival the high force, high thrust, high torque capabilities of hydraulics.  Plus, these electric actuators deliver high speed, great accuracy and repeatability and long life. Electric roller screw actuators are definitely an alternative to consider.

Our new line of RSX extreme force, hydraulic class electric linear rod actuators are designed to meet the growing need for high force in linear motion. The first product in this line, the RSX096, is available now and can deliver 30,000 lbf (133 kN) of thrust. 

As the component responsible for converting rotary into linear motion, the power screw is critical in any electric linear actuator. As a machine designer you’ll want to understand the advantages of the three screw types: acme, ball and roller. Tolomatic’s guide is a great resource to download and have at hand.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

How roller screws work

The screw’s thread form is generally triangular. In the screw, multiple threadedScrew illustration.jpg helical rollers are assembled in a planetary arrangement around the shaft. The rollers rotate within the nut while contacting the thread form of the shaft. This converts the motor’s rotary motion into linear movement of the screw shaft.

Screw components are usually ground to provide continuous contact area, smooth motion, and high thrust outputs. However, in some screws components are rolled rather than ground. This saves cost but sacrifices performance.

Roller screws have a large surface area of rollers in contact with the threads so they have higher load carrying capacities than ball screws of the same diameter. This screw technology is well suited for applications where extremely high force is required or if an application requires extended life, high degrees of precision and programmability.

Electric high force linear actuator advantages

high force linear actuator chart.jpgIt used to be that if you had a high force or heavy load application, a hydraulic cylinder was your only option. Initial cost for the cylinder was low, but along with it you got a high risk of hydraulic fluid leaks plus a space- and energy-consuming hydraulic power unit (HPU).

Now there are electric actuators powered by roller screws capable of delivering forces equal to hydraulic cylinders. These actuators are compact and offer very high levels of accuracy and repeatability, making them excellent choices for highly precise applications.  They can operate at high speeds with good acceleration, as well.

Being electric, these actuators are easily programmable and able to execute even the most complex linear motion profiles. They are pollution-free, long-lasting and need minimal maintenance.

Tolomatic high force linear actuators

We offer a range of high force actuators, all with long-lasting standard roller screws:

 Learn more

Download our guide: Which Screw? Picking the right technology.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

Topics: High force linear actuators

Electric high force linear actuators with roller screws rival hydraulic

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on
roller screw.jpgWhen you’re specifying a high force linear actuator, your application’s requirements call the shots. It used to be that hydraulic cylinders were your only recourse when high force was needed.  Now there are electric linear actuators with roller screws that rival the high force, high thrust, high torque capabilities of hydraulics.  Plus, these electric actuators deliver high speed, great accuracy and repeatability and long life. Electric roller screw actuators are definitely an alternative to consider.

Our new line of RSX extreme force, hydraulic class electric linear rod actuators are designed to meet the growing need for high force in linear motion. The first product in this line, the RSX096, is available now and can deliver 30,000 lbf (133 kN) of thrust. 

As the component responsible for converting rotary into linear motion, the power screw is critical in any electric linear actuator. As a machine designer you’ll want to understand the advantages of the three screw types: acme, ball and roller. Tolomatic’s guide is a great resource to download and have at hand.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

How roller screws work

The screw’s thread form is generally triangular. In the screw, multiple threadedScrew illustration.jpg helical rollers are assembled in a planetary arrangement around the shaft. The rollers rotate within the nut while contacting the thread form of the shaft. This converts the motor’s rotary motion into linear movement of the screw shaft.

Screw components are usually ground to provide continuous contact area, smooth motion, and high thrust outputs. However, in some screws components are rolled rather than ground. This saves cost but sacrifices performance.

Roller screws have a large surface area of rollers in contact with the threads so they have higher load carrying capacities than ball screws of the same diameter. This screw technology is well suited for applications where extremely high force is required or if an application requires extended life, high degrees of precision and programmability.

Electric high force linear actuator advantages

high force linear actuator chart.jpgIt used to be that if you had a high force or heavy load application, a hydraulic cylinder was your only option. Initial cost for the cylinder was low, but along with it you got a high risk of hydraulic fluid leaks plus a space- and energy-consuming hydraulic power unit (HPU).

Now there are electric actuators powered by roller screws capable of delivering forces equal to hydraulic cylinders. These actuators are compact and offer very high levels of accuracy and repeatability, making them excellent choices for highly precise applications.  They can operate at high speeds with good acceleration, as well.

Being electric, these actuators are easily programmable and able to execute even the most complex linear motion profiles. They are pollution-free, long-lasting and need minimal maintenance.

Tolomatic high force linear actuators

We offer a range of high force actuators, all with long-lasting standard roller screws:

 Learn more

Download our guide: Which Screw? Picking the right technology.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

Topics: High force linear actuators

[Infographic] 10 tips: Selecting Electric Rodless Linear Actuators

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on

When your application calls for an electric linear actuator, one of the first decisions you’ll make is whether to use a rodless electromechanical actuator or an electric rod actuator.rodless eletro mechAanical linear actuator

Need a linear actuator to carry a load? A rodless electric linear actuator is what you need. Want to reduce the complexity of a linear motion system?  A rodless electro-mechanical linear actuator may be the answer since it eliminates the need for other load-bearing and guiding elements. Also, a rodless electro mechanical linear actuator has a smaller footprint since its stroke lies completely within its body. These are the advantages of rodless actuators compared to electric rod actuators.  

If your application calls for a rodless linear actuator, this new infographic will help you INFOGRAPHIC rodless linear actuatorsselect the best.  Remember Tolomatic’s ten tips:

TIP #1  Calculate all loads precisely.  You need to know the static and dynamic loads involved in the application in order to select the appropriate motor, screw or belt, and other components.  That means knowing loads for all three axes (X, Y and Z.) 

TIP #2  Don’t over-size.  Over-sizing by up to two times was a common practice when specifying pneumatic linear actuators.  However, over-sizing an electric linear actuator can get very expensive.  Rely on sizing software to get the right linear actuator for the application.

TIP #3  Calculate moments (torques).  Since rodless electro mechanical linear actuators carry loads, stresses will be placed on the bearing system for the actuator’s load-carrying platform.  You can only specify the right actuator for an application if you’ve calculated roll, yaw and pitch.

TIP #4  Consider the effects of speed and inertia. Ignore speed limits with linear screw actuators and you may get noise, vibration and screw-whip. With belt driven actuators you may find heavy loads difficult to start or stop if the actuator isn’t specified with the weight and inertial forces in mind.

TIP #5  Factor in the duty cycle.  Duty cycle is the ratio of operating time to total cycle time. With electric linear actuators, underestimating the duty cycle can lead to overheating, wear and premature failure.  Overestimating can lead to costly over-sizing.

TIP #6  Mounting makes a difference.  Mounting is especially critical with a long-stroke rodless linear actuator.  Make sure you factor in enough support points.  Also, make sure the mounting surface is straight and flat and there is room for the actuator and motor combination.

TIP #7  Consider both the configuration and power output of the drive system.  A reverse parallel motor reduces the footprint of a linear motion system.  However, these motors can be less efficient because of the gear or belt reduction drives they require.  If your application needs the power of an in-line motor, make room or your system rodless linear actuatolr lifemay fail.

TIP #8  Match life expectations with actuator capabilities.  If the application requirements exceed the actuator’s capabilities, it will die an early death.  Specify a linear actuator that’s suited to the task or be prepared to replace it early and often.

TIP #9  Be certain about accuracy requirements.  Screw type has a significant impact on the accuracy of screw actuators. Belt drive actuators have limitations on accuracy due to manufacturing limitations and stretch over time.

TIP #10  Factor in the environment.  Temperature extremes (cold or hot) will affect the performance of linear actuator components. Contaminants, like oil, dust, grit, water and cleaning solutions can impact performance and service life.

Ask questions.  Share your comments.  Let us know what you think.

Use our sizing software for electric linear actuators.

For more information about Tolomatic and our products, visit www.tolomatic.com  

Follow us on Twitter:  @Tolomatic

Like us on Facebook here

Topics: Actuator selection

USDA Certification and Linear Actuators

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on

Cleanliness is next to godliness, they say. And in food and beverage manufacturing, it’s especially critical.

This type of manufacturing deals with things that can grow harmful microbes – ones that make people sick. The goal of food and beverage producers is to deliver safe and appealing products, so processing equipment has to be kept sanitary.  It's washed down frequently with water, detergents, steam, caustic soda, citric acid, and other cleaning solutions.

USDA logoThe U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates the most critical types of food and beverage processing -- operations involving dairy, meat and poultry. The USDA also offers voluntary equipment certification for components used in food and beverage production. Certification involves both thorough analysis of the design and review of the actual component.

What does this mean for linear actuators? Quite a bit actually. Linear actuators are used throughout food and beverage production – from material handling to processing to testing to conveying applications. In these applications pneumatic, hydraulic or electric linear actuators have to stand up to regular cleanings and should not be a source of contamination.

USDA certification is no easy thing for a linear actuator to get.  The requirements include:

  • Moving parts need to be protected from washdown sprays. That means they need an IP69K rating.

  • Corrosion-resistant materials like stainless steel are required for housings and exposed components in order to stand up to water and cleaning solutions.

  • Housings have to shed water and have no crevices that could collect food and microbial contamination.

  • Lubricants need to be food grade.

Because we have long been committed to meeting the needs of food and beverage processors, Tolomatic set a goal of designing linear actuators that could be USDA certified. We’re happy to say we met that goal with the ERD 25 and ERD 30 electric rod actuators. Both of these electric cylinder models are USDA certified. ERD 25 Electric cylinder, USDA-certified linear actuator

Based on our popular ERD low cost electric cylinder line these new electric rod actuator models offer a standard IP69K rating, stainless steel housing with water-shedding, crevice-free design and a variety of hygienic mounting options. With its hygienic design, the ERD is approved for use in splash or food contact zones. 

Questions or comments about this post? Let us know what you think.

And check out these resources:

For more information about Tolomatic and our products, visit www.tolomatic.com     

Follow us on Twitter: @Tolomatic

Like us on Facebook here

Topics: Actuator selection, Actuators in Food and Beverage Processing

Choosing the right linear actuator [INFOGRAPHIC]

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on

When your design calls for a linear actuator, you have lots of choices.  Pneumatic, electric, rodless, rod, belt driven, screw driven. These are just some of the options available. 

If your design calls for a rod-style linear actuator, there are three main types you’ll want to consider:

  1. pneumatic rod actuators

  2. traditional electric rod actuators

  3. integrated or intelligent actuators

Here’s an infographic that may help your selection.linear actuator selection infographic

When it comes to easy configuration, pneumatic rod actuators are the winners. They’re simple and straight-forward – an industry standard. Electric rod actuators are much more complex since you need to configure the motor, power cord, logic device and more. Integrated linear actuators are just that – integrated. They include the motor and controller so they’re easy to configure, like a pneumatic device.

If power consumption and operating efficiency are issues, consider using a traditional electric rod actuator or an integrated actuator. Pneumatic linear actuators and their supporting pneumatic systems are famous for leaks that drain power, and they only operate at about 10% efficiency. On the other hand, electrical linear actuators operate at 50-70% efficiency, and integrated actuators can typically deliver efficiencies on the upper end of that range. That efficiency means less power consumed to get a job done.

Then there’s flexibility. Pneumatic actuators score low here. They’re dependable work horses, but not very programmable with respect to positioning or speeds/acceleration. When you need multiple stops and defined speed, electric rod actuators and integrated actuators are the best choice.  

When your system calls for a linear actuator, consider your needs and your options. We hope these basic parameters help. If you need more assistance, call on Tolomatic. We’d love to assist you.

Ask questions. Share your comments. Let us know what you think.

Topics: Electric/Pneumatic Actuator Advantages