Hydraulic vs high force electric linear actuators: new infographic

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on
hydraulic vs electric actuators infographicChoosing the best linear actuator for a task takes a thorough understanding of the application. The basics like the weight of the load, the distance the load’s to be moved, and the speed and force needed are all important factors. A machine designer may also need to consider variables like environmental conditions, data collection and reporting needs as well as flexibility/programmability requirements.

If the application calls for a high force linear actuator, the usual solution has been a hydraulic cylinder. However, high force electric linear actuators are now available  (many with roller screws) and offer distinct advantages. Our new infographic compares the performance of electric, hydraulic and servohydraulic actuators on intelligence and operational parameters.

For even more information on the strengths and drawbacks of these technologies, see our white paper that compares hydraulic and electric linear actuators.

White Paper: Hydraulic versus Electric Linear Actuators

 

 

Intelligence

Control of motion variables
  • A hydraulic cylinder works well in simple, end-to-end positioning applications. However, applications that call for mid-stroke positioning require a servohydraulic actuator with a more complicated set-up.
  • An electric actuator with roller screw and servo drive/motor (like our new RSX extreme force electric rod actuator) offers infinite control over position, velocity, acceleration/deceleration, output force and more. Adjustment can be made on the fly, plus accuracy and repeatability is far better than that of a hydraulic system.

Data_visualization_process.pngData collection and reporting

There’s an emphasis on continuous improvement in manufacturing. Management wants to monitor and measure all aspects of production performance. This calls for data collection at the work point.

  • Standard hydraulic actuation systems don’t have data collection capabilities. Only expensive, complex servohydraulic systems with additional sensors can track and monitor position, velocity, force and so on at the work point.
  • Sensing capability is built into an electric actuator’s servo system. Motor current monitoring tracks force and repeatability. The motor’s feedback device registers position and velocity.

Operation

Electricity costs
  • Hydraulic systems are typically 40-55% efficient in converting electrical power to motion. Also, the HPU needs to be powered up whenever the system is on to keep  it pressurized, resulting in inefficient use of power.
  • Electric linear actuator systems, like the RSX-096 hydraulic class electric linear actuator, typically operate in the 75-80% efficiency range. When an electric actuator is at rest, it needs little or no current to hold its position.
Sensitivity to temperaturethermometer 3.jpg
  • Hydraulic oil gets thicker and slower-moving in the cold resulting in sluggish and inconsistent actuator performance. In higher temperatures, caused by overheating or the environment, oil degrades and seals fail.

A tank heater can maintain operating temperature in the cold. A heat exchanger can mitigate overheating.  However, these additional system components mean additional cost.

  • Due to their higher efficiency, electric actuator systems can run at a desired temperature for the given amount of work required. Also, electric actuators can be specified with optional extreme temperature grease for fast response in the cold.

RSX extreme force, hydraulic class electric actuators

RSX096 extreme force hydraulic class actuator_featuresOur new RSX extreme force electric linear actuators are more efficient and flexible than hydraulic cylinders. Using roller screw technology, RSX actuators are designed and tested for 100% duty cycle. The first RSX actuator in the family, the RSX-096, delivers up to 30,000 lbf (133.5 kN). It can withstand extreme conditions and cold weather operation.

Learn more

Download our white paper: Electric rod actuators vs. hydraulic cylinders: a comparison of the pros and cons of each technology.

  White Paper: Hydraulic versus Electric Linear Actuators

Topics: High force linear actuators

Electric linear actuator ebook: A resource

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on
Electric-Linear-Actuators-ebook-from-TolomaticIndustrial automation counts on the reliable motion control that linear actuators provide. Lately, electric linear actuators have gotten more popular because they offer better control of variables like speed, acceleration, position and force than pneumatic or hydraulic cylinders. Electric actuators also offer superior accuracy and repeatability, as well as programmable control that can handle even complex motion profiles.  In many applications they can do all this at a lower cost of ownership than pneumatic or hydraulic actuators.

Now there’s a resource from Tolomatic that lays out all the issues a designer needs to understand in order to select the best electric linear actuator for an application. You can download a copy of our ebook resource here. 

Ebook: A resource on electric linear actuators

Contents

Here’s what you can expect to learn from this ebook:

  • WHY ELECTRIC ACTUATORS?
    • What is a linear actuator?
    • Electric linear actuator advantages
  • ACCURACY AND REPEATABILITY IN LINEAR ACTUATORS
    • Definitions
    • Differences between accuracy and repeatability
    • Infographic on accuracy and repeatability
    • White paper on accuracy and repeatability
  • SELECTING THE RIGHT ACTUATOR: ROD OR RODLESSselecting electric rod actuators or rodless electromechanical actuators
    • Electric rod actuators
      • Infographic on tips for selecting electric rod actuators
      • White paper on how to select electric rod actuators
      • Webinar on how to select electric rod actuators
    • Rodless electromechanical actuators
      • Infographic on tips for selecting rodless electromechanical actuators
      • White paper on how to select a rodless electromechanical actuator
      • Webinar on how to select a rodless electromechanical actuator
      • White paper on screw-driven vs. belt-driven linear actuators
    • Screw selection
      • Guide to selecting the right screw type for an application -- acme, ball or roller screw
    • Environmental factors
      • White paper on IP ratings and linear actuators
    • How to compare manufacturers’ specs
      • White paper on how to calculate an “apples to apples” comparison
    • How to calculate actuator life
      • Guide to using L10 life formula for ball and roller screw-driven actuators
      • White paper on calculating actuator life
  • MOTOR SELECTION
  • SYSTEM INSTALLATION CONSIDERATIONS
    • Actuator/guide alignment
      • White paper on rules for alignment in linear motion systems
    • Electrical noise
      • White paper on minimizing electrical noise
  • ELECTRIC ACTUATOR APPLICATIONS (Examples of improved efficiency)
    • Automotive manufacturing
      • White paper on actuators for robotic resistance spot welding
      • Slide show on actuators for robotic resistance spot welding
    • Process industries
      • White paper on linear actuators for valve actuation
    • Food and beverage processingfood processing
      • White paper on selecting actuators to withstand washdown environments
      • Video on selecting actuators to withstand washdown environments
    • Material handling
      • Two case studies on conveying applications
  • TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP (TCO)
    • Infographic comparing TCO of electric actuators vs. pneumatic actuators
    • White paper on comparing TCO of electric actuators vs. pneumatic actuators
    • White paper comparing hydraulic cylinders and electric rod actuators
Each chapter in the ebook includes links to further resources for machine designers – white papers, blog posts, infographics, design tools and more. You can pick a topic you want to learn about, read an overview or go deeper into the subject by clicking a link.

Learn more

Download our ebook: A resource on electric linear actuators - What a machine designer needs to know

Ebook: A resource on electric linear actuators

Topics: Actuator selection, News and Noteworthy

Electric high force linear actuators w/ roller screws rival hydraulic

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on
roller screw.jpgWhen you’re specifying a high force linear actuator, your application’s requirements call the shots. It used to be that hydraulic cylinders were your only recourse when high force was needed.  Now there are electric linear actuators with roller screws that rival the high force, high thrust, high torque capabilities of hydraulics.  Plus, these electric actuators deliver high speed, great accuracy and repeatability and long life. Electric roller screw actuators are definitely an alternative to consider.

Our new line of RSX extreme force, hydraulic class electric linear rod actuators are designed to meet the growing need for high force in linear motion. The first product in this line, the RSX096, is available now and can deliver 30,000 lbf (133 kN) of thrust. 

As the component responsible for converting rotary into linear motion, the power screw is critical in any electric linear actuator. As a machine designer you’ll want to understand the advantages of the three screw types: acme, ball and roller. Tolomatic’s guide is a great resource to download and have at hand.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

How roller screws work

The screw’s thread form is generally triangular. In the screw, multiple threadedScrew illustration.jpg helical rollers are assembled in a planetary arrangement around the shaft. The rollers rotate within the nut while contacting the thread form of the shaft. This converts the motor’s rotary motion into linear movement of the screw shaft.

Screw components are usually ground to provide continuous contact area, smooth motion, and high thrust outputs. However, in some screws components are rolled rather than ground. This saves cost but sacrifices performance.

Roller screws have a large surface area of rollers in contact with the threads so they have higher load carrying capacities than ball screws of the same diameter. This screw technology is well suited for applications where extremely high force is required or if an application requires extended life, high degrees of precision and programmability.

Electric high force linear actuator advantages

high force linear actuator chart.jpgIt used to be that if you had a high force or heavy load application, a hydraulic cylinder was your only option. Initial cost for the cylinder was low, but along with it you got a high risk of hydraulic fluid leaks plus a space- and energy-consuming hydraulic power unit (HPU).

Now there are electric actuators powered by roller screws capable of delivering forces equal to hydraulic cylinders. These actuators are compact and offer very high levels of accuracy and repeatability, making them excellent choices for highly precise applications.  They can operate at high speeds with good acceleration, as well.

Being electric, these actuators are easily programmable and able to execute even the most complex linear motion profiles. They are pollution-free, long-lasting and need minimal maintenance.

Tolomatic high force linear actuators

We offer a range of high force actuators, all with long-lasting standard roller screws:

 Learn more

Download our guide: Which Screw? Picking the right technology.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

Topics: High force linear actuators

Electric high force linear actuators with roller screws rival hydraulic

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on
roller screw.jpgWhen you’re specifying a high force linear actuator, your application’s requirements call the shots. It used to be that hydraulic cylinders were your only recourse when high force was needed.  Now there are electric linear actuators with roller screws that rival the high force, high thrust, high torque capabilities of hydraulics.  Plus, these electric actuators deliver high speed, great accuracy and repeatability and long life. Electric roller screw actuators are definitely an alternative to consider.

Our new line of RSX extreme force, hydraulic class electric linear rod actuators are designed to meet the growing need for high force in linear motion. The first product in this line, the RSX096, is available now and can deliver 30,000 lbf (133 kN) of thrust. 

As the component responsible for converting rotary into linear motion, the power screw is critical in any electric linear actuator. As a machine designer you’ll want to understand the advantages of the three screw types: acme, ball and roller. Tolomatic’s guide is a great resource to download and have at hand.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

How roller screws work

The screw’s thread form is generally triangular. In the screw, multiple threadedScrew illustration.jpg helical rollers are assembled in a planetary arrangement around the shaft. The rollers rotate within the nut while contacting the thread form of the shaft. This converts the motor’s rotary motion into linear movement of the screw shaft.

Screw components are usually ground to provide continuous contact area, smooth motion, and high thrust outputs. However, in some screws components are rolled rather than ground. This saves cost but sacrifices performance.

Roller screws have a large surface area of rollers in contact with the threads so they have higher load carrying capacities than ball screws of the same diameter. This screw technology is well suited for applications where extremely high force is required or if an application requires extended life, high degrees of precision and programmability.

Electric high force linear actuator advantages

high force linear actuator chart.jpgIt used to be that if you had a high force or heavy load application, a hydraulic cylinder was your only option. Initial cost for the cylinder was low, but along with it you got a high risk of hydraulic fluid leaks plus a space- and energy-consuming hydraulic power unit (HPU).

Now there are electric actuators powered by roller screws capable of delivering forces equal to hydraulic cylinders. These actuators are compact and offer very high levels of accuracy and repeatability, making them excellent choices for highly precise applications.  They can operate at high speeds with good acceleration, as well.

Being electric, these actuators are easily programmable and able to execute even the most complex linear motion profiles. They are pollution-free, long-lasting and need minimal maintenance.

Tolomatic high force linear actuators

We offer a range of high force actuators, all with long-lasting standard roller screws:

 Learn more

Download our guide: Which Screw? Picking the right technology.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

Topics: High force linear actuators

[Infographic] 10 tips: Selecting Electric Rodless Linear Actuators

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on

When your application calls for an electric linear actuator, one of the first decisions you’ll make is whether to use a rodless electromechanical actuator or an electric rod actuator.rodless eletro mechAanical linear actuator

Need a linear actuator to carry a load? A rodless electric linear actuator is what you need. Want to reduce the complexity of a linear motion system?  A rodless electro-mechanical linear actuator may be the answer since it eliminates the need for other load-bearing and guiding elements. Also, a rodless electro mechanical linear actuator has a smaller footprint since its stroke lies completely within its body. These are the advantages of rodless actuators compared to electric rod actuators.  

If your application calls for a rodless linear actuator, this new infographic will help you INFOGRAPHIC rodless linear actuatorsselect the best.  Remember Tolomatic’s ten tips:

TIP #1  Calculate all loads precisely.  You need to know the static and dynamic loads involved in the application in order to select the appropriate motor, screw or belt, and other components.  That means knowing loads for all three axes (X, Y and Z.) 

TIP #2  Don’t over-size.  Over-sizing by up to two times was a common practice when specifying pneumatic linear actuators.  However, over-sizing an electric linear actuator can get very expensive.  Rely on sizing software to get the right linear actuator for the application.

TIP #3  Calculate moments (torques).  Since rodless electro mechanical linear actuators carry loads, stresses will be placed on the bearing system for the actuator’s load-carrying platform.  You can only specify the right actuator for an application if you’ve calculated roll, yaw and pitch.

TIP #4  Consider the effects of speed and inertia. Ignore speed limits with linear screw actuators and you may get noise, vibration and screw-whip. With belt driven actuators you may find heavy loads difficult to start or stop if the actuator isn’t specified with the weight and inertial forces in mind.

TIP #5  Factor in the duty cycle.  Duty cycle is the ratio of operating time to total cycle time. With electric linear actuators, underestimating the duty cycle can lead to overheating, wear and premature failure.  Overestimating can lead to costly over-sizing.

TIP #6  Mounting makes a difference.  Mounting is especially critical with a long-stroke rodless linear actuator.  Make sure you factor in enough support points.  Also, make sure the mounting surface is straight and flat and there is room for the actuator and motor combination.

TIP #7  Consider both the configuration and power output of the drive system.  A reverse parallel motor reduces the footprint of a linear motion system.  However, these motors can be less efficient because of the gear or belt reduction drives they require.  If your application needs the power of an in-line motor, make room or your system rodless linear actuatolr lifemay fail.

TIP #8  Match life expectations with actuator capabilities.  If the application requirements exceed the actuator’s capabilities, it will die an early death.  Specify a linear actuator that’s suited to the task or be prepared to replace it early and often.

TIP #9  Be certain about accuracy requirements.  Screw type has a significant impact on the accuracy of screw actuators. Belt drive actuators have limitations on accuracy due to manufacturing limitations and stretch over time.

TIP #10  Factor in the environment.  Temperature extremes (cold or hot) will affect the performance of linear actuator components. Contaminants, like oil, dust, grit, water and cleaning solutions can impact performance and service life.

Ask questions.  Share your comments.  Let us know what you think.

Use our sizing software for electric linear actuators.

For more information about Tolomatic and our products, visit www.tolomatic.com  

Follow us on Twitter:  @Tolomatic

Like us on Facebook here

Topics: Actuator selection

USDA Certification and Linear Actuators

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on

Cleanliness is next to godliness, they say. And in food and beverage manufacturing, it’s especially critical.

This type of manufacturing deals with things that can grow harmful microbes – ones that make people sick. The goal of food and beverage producers is to deliver safe and appealing products, so processing equipment has to be kept sanitary.  It's washed down frequently with water, detergents, steam, caustic soda, citric acid, and other cleaning solutions.

USDA logoThe U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates the most critical types of food and beverage processing -- operations involving dairy, meat and poultry. The USDA also offers voluntary equipment certification for components used in food and beverage production. Certification involves both thorough analysis of the design and review of the actual component.

What does this mean for linear actuators? Quite a bit actually. Linear actuators are used throughout food and beverage production – from material handling to processing to testing to conveying applications. In these applications pneumatic, hydraulic or electric linear actuators have to stand up to regular cleanings and should not be a source of contamination.

USDA certification is no easy thing for a linear actuator to get.  The requirements include:

  • Moving parts need to be protected from washdown sprays. That means they need an IP69K rating.

  • Corrosion-resistant materials like stainless steel are required for housings and exposed components in order to stand up to water and cleaning solutions.

  • Housings have to shed water and have no crevices that could collect food and microbial contamination.

  • Lubricants need to be food grade.

Because we have long been committed to meeting the needs of food and beverage processors, Tolomatic set a goal of designing linear actuators that could be USDA certified. We’re happy to say we met that goal with the ERD 25 and ERD 30 electric rod actuators. Both of these electric cylinder models are USDA certified. ERD 25 Electric cylinder, USDA-certified linear actuator

Based on our popular ERD low cost electric cylinder line these new electric rod actuator models offer a standard IP69K rating, stainless steel housing with water-shedding, crevice-free design and a variety of hygienic mounting options. With its hygienic design, the ERD is approved for use in splash or food contact zones. 

Questions or comments about this post? Let us know what you think.

And check out these resources:

For more information about Tolomatic and our products, visit www.tolomatic.com     

Follow us on Twitter: @Tolomatic

Like us on Facebook here

Topics: Actuator selection, Actuators in Food and Beverage Processing

Choosing the right linear actuator [INFOGRAPHIC]

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on

When your design calls for a linear actuator, you have lots of choices.  Pneumatic, electric, rodless, rod, belt driven, screw driven. These are just some of the options available. 

If your design calls for a rod-style linear actuator, there are three main types you’ll want to consider:

  1. pneumatic rod actuators

  2. traditional electric rod actuators

  3. integrated or intelligent actuators

Here’s an infographic that may help your selection.linear actuator selection infographic

When it comes to easy configuration, pneumatic rod actuators are the winners. They’re simple and straight-forward – an industry standard. Electric rod actuators are much more complex since you need to configure the motor, power cord, logic device and more. Integrated linear actuators are just that – integrated. They include the motor and controller so they’re easy to configure, like a pneumatic device.

If power consumption and operating efficiency are issues, consider using a traditional electric rod actuator or an integrated actuator. Pneumatic linear actuators and their supporting pneumatic systems are famous for leaks that drain power, and they only operate at about 10% efficiency. On the other hand, electrical linear actuators operate at 50-70% efficiency, and integrated actuators can typically deliver efficiencies on the upper end of that range. That efficiency means less power consumed to get a job done.

Then there’s flexibility. Pneumatic actuators score low here. They’re dependable work horses, but not very programmable with respect to positioning or speeds/acceleration. When you need multiple stops and defined speed, electric rod actuators and integrated actuators are the best choice.  

When your system calls for a linear actuator, consider your needs and your options. We hope these basic parameters help. If you need more assistance, call on Tolomatic. We’d love to assist you.

Ask questions. Share your comments. Let us know what you think.

Topics: Electric/Pneumatic Actuator Advantages

High force linear actuator: electric replaces hydraulic

Posted by Nick Holmgard on
LUMBER_MILLIt used to be that when a machine designer was confronted with a high force linear actuator application, the only solution was a hydraulic cylinder.  That meant the designer had to factor in the bulky hydraulic power unit (HPU), the inevitable leaks of hydraulic fluid and the downtime produced by frequent maintenance.

Now there’s another option when a high force linear actuator is needed. There are electric linear actuator products that can meet demanding specifications with ease. 

Often, high force performance starts with the selection of the correct power screw/nut combination. Roller screws offer the best performance in both high force and long life, although ball screws deliver higher thrust than acme screws. Download our guide to screw selection for more information.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

Sawmill needs a change

A sawmill needed a new linear actuator solution for moving a heavy saw blade used to cut logs. They had been using hydraulic cylinders because it took a lot of force to move the saw; however, the cylinders leaked fluid and contaminated the surrounding environment. The sawmill is located on a protected body of water, and contamination can incur hefty government fines.

Production is wet and dusty due to wood particles generated by sawing and water used to cool saw blades. Also logs often strike equipment, and there are extreme temperature fluctuations.

The hydraulic cylinders stood up to the dirty environment and impacts but had trouble with temperature changes. Cold temperatures resulted in sluggish and inconsistent performance. Heat caused oil to degrade and seals to fail. The cylinders had significant maintenance requirements that causeRSA electric linear actuator in sawmilld equipment downtime, plus they had low accuracy and were difficult to adjust or change.

New high force linear actuator solution

The company wanted accuracy, repeatability and programmability as well as the high force, environmentally-friendly, heavy duty attributes noted above. Their best solution was electric linear actuators.

The sawmill settled on the recommended IP67-rated RSA high force linear actuator because it could:

  • Deliver the accuracy, speed and force required
  • Eliminate hydraulic fluid as a source of environmental contamination
  • Withstand dust, water spray and impacts
  • Increase the reliability of the sawing equipment and reduce maintenance
  • Operate in low and high temperatures
  • Be re-programmed quickly and easily for multiple motion profiles

The RSA64 high force actuator’s heavy duty design can survive the sawmill’s rigors, even shocks and impacts. The IP67 selection seals the actuator against spraying water and wood dust. Special grease means the actuator can perform well in all temperatures.  The RSA64 selected used a roller screw to deliver the required thrust.

RSA electric rod actuators

rsa heavy duty actuatorRSA/RSM heavy duty linear actuators offer an extensive selection of sizes, options and system components. RSA-HT models are capable of force up to 13,039 lbf or 58 kN. Designed with high force, heavy duty performance, and long-term reliability in mind, RSA/RSM high force linear actuators are a cost-competitive solution for many applications.

Click here for a catalog of the RSA/RSM family 

RSA brochure

Learn more

Download our guide: Which Screw? Picking the right technology.

GUIDE Which screw? Picking the right technology

Topics: High force linear actuators

Electric linear actuator accuracy and repeatability webinar

Posted by Gary Rosengren on

accuracy_and_repeatability_in_linear_actuators.jpgWhen an engineer is developing a machine design, accuracy is often top-of-mind.  So is machine cost. But these two considerations can be at odds since the usual scenario is that the higher the accuracy of a device, the higher the cost. This certainly holds true for electric linear actuators and linear motion systems.

Engineers often ask us about the accuracy of our different products. They’d like a simple answer, but there really isn’t one. Accuracy is dependent on many factors, so you have to look at the application itself to know how an actuator will perform.

Don’t throw your hands up in frustration, though. Talk to Tolomatic first when your design calls for linear motion. It might be that what your application really needs is repeatability rather than accuracy. Or you may be able to adjust mounting and other parameters so you can use a lower cost actuator.

To learn about accuracy and repeatability in electric linear motion systems, download our white paper. 

  White paper:  accuracy & repeatability

Or view our webinar

 

 Definitions

Here are two definitions you need to know.

  •  Accuracy means hitting the bullseye every time. In linear actuator terms that means consistently reaching an assigned position.
  • Repeatability means reaching the same position time after time. That position may or may not be the assigned position. So you may not be hitting the bullseye but you’re hitting the same point on the target every time.

Match the actuator to the application

electric linear actuators from TolomaticAs we mentioned above, accuracy is affected by many factors. Along with the potential for inaccuracy in the motor, controller and encoder, every elecric linear motion system has the potential for position errors around the X, Y and Z axes of the actuator itself. Back and forth. Side to side. Up and down. Linear actuators are mechanical devices with built-in tolerances along these planes and, of course, there’s rotation around each axis to keep in mind.

Let’s consider the housing of an actuator. Maybe the housing allows some bow and twist which would lead to position errors on the X and Y axes. This might make the actuator inappropriate for some high-precision applications and cause a machine designer to look at more accurate alternatives.

That same actuator could perform very well in another application, though. Consider an application where the actuator can be secured to a known flat surface. That would eliminate the bow and twist problems, allowing the machine designer to use a lower cost actuator that’s theoretically less accurate but repeatable and performs well in practice.

Learn more

Download our white paper: Introduction to accuracy and repeatability in linear motion systems

White paper:  accuracy & repeatability

Topics: Actuator selection

Electric linear actuators meet the challenge of FSMA

Posted by Aaron Dietrich on

clean-in-place (CIP)The federal Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) that was enacted in 2011 has energized the food industry around food safety and the prevention of food-borne illnesses. Most of the major producers and food equipment manufacturers have kept ahead of FSMA requirements successfully since food safety and prevention have always been among their top priorities.

As a supplier of electric linear actuators for food processing, we were very interested in this recent article in Packaging + Processing OEM that details the current state of the industry and FSMA compliance.

Read it here.

Easy-to-clean electric actuators keep food safe

FSMA has had a significant impact on food industry cleaning processes. Food producers agree that equipment needs to be thoroughly cleaned, regularly and often. The emphasis now is on reducing the time cleaning procedures take while maintaining effectiveness and reducing cost.

Because electric actuators are important components in food manufacturing, they either have to withstand washdowns [and be clean-in-place (CIP) compliant], or they have to be shielded from food particles and moisture. Shielding adds cost and complexity to a machine’s design so it’s not the optimal solution. Easy-to-clean actutators make better sense in terms of both foodsafety and economics.

When they’re selecting linear actuators for food processing washdown environments, machine designers look for key cleaning-related features like

  • stainless steel housings, fasteners and motor enclosures
  • corrosion-resistant seals
  • water-shedding designs
  • IP69K rating (no need for shielding)

Tolomatic has easy-to-clean ERD IP69K electric cylinders that are well-suited to CIP electric linear actuators for food processingfood processing demands. The ERD electric rod actuator series includes SS2 (15 and 20) and USDA approved (22, 25 and 30) models that are CIP compliant. Because these electric cylinders don’t have to be shielded, machine design is streamlined and costs are kept down.

Download our catalog. 

ERD Catalog

Learn more

Download our white paper: Evaluating actuators for washdown in food and beverage applications.

Evaluating linear actuators  for food and beverage  processing

And contact Tolomatic. We’re here to help.

Topics: Actuators in Food and Beverage Processing